Last edited by Kagalrajas
Tuesday, November 10, 2020 | History

5 edition of history of Roman sea-power before the Second Punic War. found in the catalog.

history of Roman sea-power before the Second Punic War.

J. H. Thiel

history of Roman sea-power before the Second Punic War.

  • 69 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by North-Holland Pub. Co. in Amsterdam .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Rome -- History, Naval

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. [359]-361. Bibliographical footnotes.

    Other titlesTitle: Roman sea-power.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDG89. T48
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 367 p.
    Number of Pages367
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21600270M
    LC Control Number55031934

      Roman Warfare by Adrian Goldsworthy A History of Sea Power by Steven Williams The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Warfare ed. Sabin Hannibal's War: A military History of the Second Punic War by Lazenby Scipio Africanus: Greater Than Napoleon by Liddell-Hart The Roman Army Of The Punic Wars BC by Nic Fields Phew, it's been an. ~The wars against the Carthaginians, 2nd Punic war was Hannibal. =Phoenician. Roman Conquest, A series of three wars between Rome and Carthage ( B.C.); resulted in the destruction of Carthage and Rome's dominance over the western Mediterranean. Thiel, J.H., Studies on the History of Roman Sea-Power in Republican Times, Amsterdam: North-Holland, ————, A History of Roman Sea-Power before the Second Punic War, Amsterdam: North-Holland, Rome and Carthage fought the three Punic Wars against each other. The first war was of fought over the control of Sicily. Rome won, took over Sicily and .

    the Punic Wars transformed Rome into the leading Mediterranean power. At the end of the Second Punic War, arthage was invaded, and they lost territory in Spain and North Africa to Rome. Hannibal was exiled from arthage. He fought for other enemies of the Romans until , when he was surrounded by Roman forces and took poison.


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history of Roman sea-power before the Second Punic War. by J. H. Thiel Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Naval history: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Thiel, J.H. (Johannes Hendrik), History of Roman sea-power before the Second Punic War. A History of Roman Sea-Power before the Second Punic War [J.H. Thiel] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

A History of Roman Author: J.H. Thiel. A history of Roman sea-power before the second Punic war by J. Thiel,North-Holland Pub. edition, in EnglishPages: The three Punic Wars, fought over a hundred year period between Rome and the ancient sea power of Carthage was the most important series of wars undertaken by the Roman Republic.

There were several reasons for this: First, the wars transformed Rome from a regional land power to a wide ranging sea-power. Get this from a library. A history of Roman sea-power before the Second Punic War.

[Johannes Hendrik Thiel]. Second Punic War ( B.C.) Over the next decades, Rome took over control of both Corsica and Sardinia as well, but Carthage was able to establish a new base of influence in Spain beginning in.

Sea Power in the Second Punic War. It is said that Rome, like Wihelmine and Hitlerian Germany, was forced to go to sea against her will.

Unlike the Phoenicians and Athenians before them, Romans allegedly had no fondness for ships and seafaring. Roman Sea-Power - J. Thiel: A History of Roman Sea-Power before the Second Punic War. viii + Amsterdam: North-Holland Publishing Co., Categories: Classics in Arts and Humanities.

Sumner, G. ‘ Roman policy in Spain before the Hannibalic War ’, Harvard Studies in Classical Philology. 72 () Thiel, J. Studies on the History of Roman Sea-power in Republican Times.

Amsterdam, Cited by: J.F. Lazenby claims his book is the first history of the First Punic War in English. The story, of course, as been told before, but usually as a scene-setter for the more dramatic career of Hannibal in the Second War. Since my primary interest is the role of sea power, the First Punic War is of special interest.

Polybius, our fullest /5. Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. () Exploratio: Military and Political Intelligence in the Roman World from the Second Punic War to the Battle of Adrianople Thiel, J.

() A History of Roman Sea Power before the Second Punic War. Amsterdam. Walbank, F. When Carthage besieged the Roman protected town of Saguntum in BC, it ignited the Second Punic War with Rome.[76] As for Rome, the end of the First Punic War marked the start of the Rome's expansion beyond the Italian Peninsula.

Sicily became the first Roman province (Sicilia) governed by a former praetor, instead of an ally. War before History. History of Roman sea-power before the Second Punic War. book first book examines all reported instances of deadly violence among chimpanzees, A History of Roman Sea-Power before the Second Punic War.

Amsterdam: North Holland. Full text of "Studies On The History Of Roman Sea-power In Republican Times" See other formats. The Punic Wars presented a pivotal moment in the history of Roman expansion. Before the First Punic War began in BC, Rome had conquered most of Italy in a.

Buy A History of Roman Sea-Power Before the Second Punic War First Edition by Thiel J H (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Thiel J H.

THE ROLE OF SEA POWER IN ANTIQUITY: A REJOINDER TO CHESTER STARR By James J. Bloom I. Chester Starr Adrift. In researching the naval aspects of the Roman-Jewish War, it struck me that there was no comprehensive overview of ancient maritime power (or sea power, if you will) apart from Chester Starr’s survey, The Influence of Sea Power on Ancient History.

The Duumviri navales, literally two men who for dealing with naval matters, were two naval officers elected by the people of Rome to repair and equip the Roman fleet.

Both Duumvir navales were assigned to one Roman consul, and each controlled 20 ships. It has been suggested that they may have been in charge of the ships of the Socii navales rather than those of the Roman. efforts, despite the fact that it had never been used in Italy before the First Punic War.6 The exact construction of this galley is a complex issue still 3 Pol.

i ; cf. Thiel, History For the man total complement of a trireme see Lionel Casson, Shps andSeamanship in the Ancient World(Princeton ) (henceforth Ships) 84, The First Punic Warby J.F.

Lazenby, Stanford University Press, Palo Alto,Calif.,$45 (hardcover), $ (softcover). The First Punic War was Rome’s first overseas war. It was also history’s first “world war,” lasting a quarter century ( bc) and involving major powers battling by land and sea over a wide geographic : Historynet Staff.

A history of Carthage. Insofar as it can be reconstructed. Not only were there no Carthaginian histories to survive, there is the interesting history of the Greek and Roman histories, where the best source may be reconstructed from the quotations taken from another work, which also did not survive, but drew heavily on the original source/5.

Second Punic War. As to the Second Punic War (– BC), the ancient Greek historian Polybius gives three causes: the anger of Hamilcar Barca (father of Hannibal) whose army in Sicily the Romans did not defeat in the first war; the Roman seizure of Sardinia during the mercenary revolt; and, creation by the Barcid military family of a new.

The Punic Wars and Expansion In the 3rd and 2nd Centuries BC, Rome, after consolidating its hold on the Italian peninsula would soon come up against the power of the Mediterranean, Carthage. Carthage was Phoenician city founded in BC, and the term Punic relates to the Latin and Greek words for Phoenician.

Roman fear of an increase in Carthaginian power and sphere of control, therefore, was a major cause of the outbreak of the First Punic War. This motive was largely defensive and preemptive in nature.

In a later context, Polybius also says that the Romans had been content up until to protect the : Paul J. Burton. Thiel, J. () A History of Roman Sea-Power Before the Second Punic War. Amsterdam: North Holland Publishing Co.

Declaring War in the Roman Republic in. The Punic Wars triggered an era of astonishing human misfortune. Resulting from a mighty power struggle between the military confederation of Rome and the trading empire of Carthage between B.C., B.C., and b.c., the wars were fought over a period of years/5.

Alfred Thayer Mahan's nineteenth-century classic, The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, has long occupied a central place in the canon of strategic as Chester G. Starr shows in this thought-provoking work, Mahan's theories have also led to serious misperceptions among historians about the significance of naval superiority in antiquity/5(3).

The period between the Roman defeats at Trebia, Trasimene, and Cannae from B.C. and the roan invasion of Africa in B.C. is at best glossed over or briefly described as a brutal learning period for Rome before their final and often times implied inevitable, defeat of Hannibal at Zama in B.C.

Through his book, The Influence of Sea Power in the Ancient History, he said the the sea transportations were the main elements to achieve victory in the Peloponnesian War and the Second Punic War. The ships were mainly used to transport large amounts of troops in a fast manner effectively and secure supply routes.

A History of Roman sea-power before the second Punic war. University of Michigan: North-Holland Publishing Company. University of Michigan: North-Holland Publishing Company.

The Roman navy was essentially created in response to the Carthaginian navy in the early stages of the First Punic War, so navally, yes the conflict forced the Romans to create a navy. In terms of a land army, the massive blood letting of the Punic Wars and the vast losses among the "citizen army" that Rome relied upon led directly to the.

Carthage, great city of antiquity on the north coast of Africa, now a residential suburb of the city of Tunis, Tunisia. According to tradition, Carthage was founded by the Phoenicians of Tyre in BCE; its Phoenician name means ‘new town.’ Learn more about Carthage in this article.

The Influence of Sea Power upon History/Introductory. a man of exceptional ability, to whom was due later the most decisive military movement made by any Roman general during the Second Punic War.

This seasonable reinforcement, which again assured the shaken grip on Hasdrubal's line of march, came by sea,--a way which, though most rapid and.

Carthaginian military commander who, in the Second Punic War, attempted a surprise attack on Rome, crossing the Alps with a large group of soldiers, horses, and elephants.

Cannae Battle that ended in Roman defeat in the Second Punic War, though the Romans ended up winning the war. Contents: Greek historian Polybius records the rise of the Roman superpower from one hill besieged by Gauls in BC to an empire spanning the known world, concentrating on the First and Second Punic Wars between Carthage and Rome, but also describing contemporaneous events in Macedonia, Egypt, and Syria, providing a ‘world history’, notably.

The First Punic War By the mid 3rd century BC, the Roman Republic had secured its position on the Italian peninsula with victories over the Etruscans, the Latin League, the Samnites, and Pyrrhus. Victory, though valiantly contested by all foes, bred confidence with the Romans and while conflict with regional powers like Carthage was daunting.

On the naval war see J. Thiel, History of Roman Sea Power before the Second Punic War (). Google Scholar On the size of the fleets, see W. Tarn, _WS48 : M. Cary, H.

Scullard. Punic Wars to Imperialism 1. Bones 1 Patrick Bones History of the Roman Republic Professor Roncaglia Novem The Punic Wars and Roman Imperialism By the time that Rome transitioned into an Empire it had already become an imperial power and by the days of Caesar it had become nearly unrecognizable from the early Republic.

Philip and Macedon, since The Second Punic war had been associated in the Roman mind with the enemy, Carthage. Philip’s vague treaty with Carthage had firmly fixed him in the Roman mind as an enemy of Rome and his hostile actions in Illyria had greatly exacerbated an.

Steinby, C. “War at Sea in the Second Punic War” in Ancient Society, (), pp. Thiel, J. Studies on the History of Roman Sea Power in Republican Times.

Amsterdam, Thiel, J. A History of Roman Sea Power before the Second Punic War. Amsterdam. Roman Sea-Power - J.

H. Thiel: A History of Roman Sea-Power Before the Second Punic War. Pp. Viii + Amsterdam: North-Holland Publishing Co., On the Roman navy from to B.c.

see J. H. Thiel, Studies on the History of Roman Sea-Power in Republican Times (); Brunt, Manpower, ff. Cf. also the Introduction to Admiral Mahon’s classic Influence of Sea-Power on History, – Google ScholarAuthor: M. Cary, H. H. Scullard.The Influence of Sea Power upon the Frenchw Revolution and Empire.

'I By Captain A. T. MAHAN, U.S.N. Two volumes. Boston, Little, Brown & Co., I - vi,pp. Captain Mahan has done more than write a new book upon naval history. He has even done more than write the best book that has.